Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Balloons

Steal this terrific idea from this wedding on Perfect Bound: After the grand ceremony at St. Patrick's Cathedral in NYC, guests gathered outside the cathedral, and as the new couple made their exit, 100 bright yellow balloons were released into the summer sky.

4 comments:

True Blind Faith said...

Balloons are so happy! Birght yellow balloons against steel and grey buildings in NYC = perfection.

Anonymous said...

I love balloons but releasing them into the sky is not great for the environment...

Rea said...

THE IMPRESSIVE VISUAL IMPACT OF THOUSANDS OF BALLOONS BEING RELEASED INTO THE SKY MAY LAST A FEW MINUTES, BUT THE IMPACT ON WILDLIFE AND THE MARINE CONSERVATION ENVIRONMENT MAY LAST MANY MONTHS WITH POTENTIALLY HARMFUL CONSEQUENCES

Many people are-unaware that balloon releases can result in littering and harm to wildlife. Once balloons are out of sight, they don't disappear - what goes up must come down! An estimated 90-95% of released balloons rise to an altitude of 5 miles where the temperature and pressure is such that they burst into small fragments. The remaining 5-10% that do not reach a high enough altitude may remain inflated and can float many miles before descending back to the land or the sea semi-inflated.

The largest ever balloon release was 1.4 million balloons, 1O% of which - 140,000 - may have returned to the land and sea where they could have been mistaken for prey and eaten by animals.

Releasing balloons at large promotional and corporate events is not something that can be done without thinking about the consequences. Mass releases are potent symbols of our wasteful and 'throw away' society, whilst smaller releases and balloon races can result in a high percentage of balloons littering the land and sea.
Problems caused by balloon releases
Once balloons are released, they can become a serious form of marine pollution. A long list of marine creatures - dolphins, whales, turtles, fish, and seabirds - have been reported with balloons in their stomachs. It is believed that they mistake balloons and other buoyant plastics for their natural prey e.g. jellyfish and squid, and eat them.

The following species, all of which occur in the North East Atlantic waters off the UK, have been reported with latex balloons in the digestive systems:

* Common Dolphin
* Risso's Dolphin
* Loggerhead Turtle
* Leatherback Turtle
* Blue Shark
* Northern Fulmar

It is very difficult to prove that ingestion of a balloon has been the direct cause of death of a beached animal. However, the fact that balloons have been identified in the stomachs of these animals indicates that the balloons are not rapidly broken down by an animal's digestive system and/or that death occurred shortly after ingestion of the balloon.

Whilst most balloons used in balloon releases are made of biodegradable latex, some are made of mylar foil which persists much longer in the marine environment. An infant sperm whale met its death in New Jersey in 1985 as a result of ingestion of an inflated mylar balloon which had lodged in its intestines. Consequently, the whale died of starvation.

http://209.85.129.132/search?q=cache:neihqDptAQ0J:www.ukrivers.net/balloon_fact.html+why+balloons+not+environtment+friendly&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&client=firefox-a

American girls marries Polish boy in Germany: said...

well gee, that's kind of a downer. I myself have worked for many an environmental organisation and, of course, releasing balloons has its environmental impact - as do so many wedding related things. Regardless, I have another nice balloon related activity to show - a German Tradition- here on my blog.